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Research Center for World Buddhist Cultures

Activities

Special Lectures・2018

【February 14, 2019】Special Lecture “The Sacredness of Modern Japanese Emperors and Buddhas and Kami”

Date
February 14 2019, 15:00-16:30
Place
Conference Room, 2nd Floor West Hall, Omiya Campus, Ryukoku University
Presenter
(Timetable)

Dr. Fumihiko Sueki (International Research Center for Japanese Studies)

 

 

Special Lecture

“The Sacredness of Modern Japanese Emperors and Buddhas and Kami”

(近代天皇の聖性と神仏)

 

Free of charge. No reservation is needed.

The lecture is held in Japanese.

Sponsors
Research Center for World Buddhist Cultures, Ryukoku University
Poster
"The Sacredness of Modern Japanese Emperors and Buddhas and Kami"

 

Inquiries:rcwbc.office@gmail.com

【February 7, 2019】 Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism Special Lecture

Date
February 7, 2019, 3:00~4:30 pm
Place
Conference Room, 2nd Floor West Hall, Ōmiya Campus, Ryukoku University
Presenter
(Timetable)

Dr. Jacqueline I. Stone

The Toshihide Nowata Book Award in Buddhism was established in 2009 in order to support the further development of the Buddhist studies especially in the Western world. The eining entry for rhe best academic Buddhist title of the year is selected by an independent committee. The awardee for fiscal year 2017 was Dr. Jacqueline I. Stone, Professor,Department of Religion, Princeton University, and her Right Thoughts at the Last Moment: Buddhism and Deathbed Practices in Early Medieval Japan.Dr. Stone’s chief research area is medieval Japanese Buddhism. And also, She is ongoing research the traditions of the Lotus Sūtra, particularly Tendai and Nichiren Buddhism, as well as their modern redefinitions.

On February 7, 2019, Dr. Stone held the special lecture whose title was “By the Power of One’s Last Nenbutsu: Deathbed Practices in Early Medieval Japan.” In her lecture, Dr. Stone explained what the deathbed practices 臨終行儀 in Buddhism is, and she mentioned how this practices progagated to many people in Japan. And also, Dr. Stone dealed with the role that Kalyāṇa-mittatā 善知識 played in this practice.

*****************************

Dr. Jacqueline I. Stone (Professor, Department of Religion, Princeton University)

Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism Special Lecture

By the Power of One’s Last Nenbutsu: Deathbed Practices in Early Medieval Japan

 

Speaker: Dr. Jacqueline I. Stone (Professor, Department of Religion, Princeton University)

 

Chair: Mitsuya Dake (Professor, Faculty of International Studies, Department of International Communication, Ryukoku University)

 

Free of charge. No reservation is needed.

The lecture is held in Japanese.

 

【Map】

Inquiries:rcwbc.office@gmail.com

Research Center for World Buddhist Cultures, Ryukoku University
Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai (Society for the Promotion of Buddhism)
Research Center for Buddhist Cultures in Asia, Ryukoku University
Poster
Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism Special Lecture

【Announcement】 Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials at Ryukoku University (Fourth Meeting) 【past】

Date
June 22 to 24, 2018
Place
Omiya campus, Ryukoku University in Kyoto
Presenter
(Timetable)

From June 22th to 24th, the Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials (Fourth Meeting) was held at Omiya campus, Ryukoku University in Kyoto. In this workshop, Participants were divided into four groups and attempted to translate the commentaries on Tannishō written during the Edo time period into English. A lot of scholars gathered from the countries such as the U.S.A., Israel, and Taiwan, and actively engaged in the discussion.

In the workshop, Dr. Ayako Ōsawa and Mr. Wayne Yokoyama gave lectures on June 22. In addition, Rev. Shin’in Nishida also gave the special lecture “On the Study of the Tannisho in Edo Period” on June 23.


Conference Room, 2nd Floor West Hall

Welcome party

Rev. Shin’in Nishida

Small Group Translation Session

June 22, 2018

Meeting place: Conference Room, 2nd Floor West Hall, Omiya Campus Ryukoku University.

Meeting time: 10:00 am.

Please check the PDF attached to this mail or see the following website.

https://www.ryukoku.ac.jp/english2/about/location.html

https://www.ryukoku.ac.jp/english2/about/access/omiya.html

Program (New)

 

The Research Center for World Buddhist Cultures at Ryukoku University together with the Centers for Japanese Studies and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley and the Shin Buddhist Comprehensive Research Institute at Otani University announce the fourth in a series of workshops led by Prof. Mark Blum, Prof. Michael Conway, and Prof. Mitsuya Dake devoted to the critical examination of premodern and modern hermeneutics of the Tannishō, a core text of Shin school of Buddhism, and arguably the most well-read religious text in postwar Japan.

The fourth workshop will be held at Ryukoku University Omiya Campus in Kyoto from June 22 to 24, 2018. The first workshop was held successfully in Berkley in March 2017 and succeeding workshops will continue until 2021, with meetings planned twice a year. The second workshop was held in Kyoto in early August 2017, the third one was held in Berkeley in March 2018. The fourth one will be hosted by Ryukoku University in Kyoto in June.

 

Organized around close readings of the most influential materials produced in early modern and modern Japan, the workshop aims at producing a critical, annotated translation detailing the salient ways in which this text has been both inspirational and controversial, as well as a series of essays analyzing a wide spectrum of voices in Japanese scholarship and preaching that have spoken on this work.

 

Following the previous workshops, the workshop will focus on an English translation of Edo-period commentaries by Enchi (1662), Jukoku (1740), Jinrei (1801-1808), and Ryōshō (1841). There will also be special lectures regarding Tannishō during the workshop.

 

◆ Location

Omiya campus, Ryukoku University in Kyoto

*Omiya campus of Ryukoku University is close to JR Kyoto station. For detailed information please see the following sites.

https://www.ryukoku.ac.jp/english2/about/location.html

https://www.ryukoku.ac.jp/about/campus_traffic/traffic/t_omiya.html

 

◆ Cost

There is no participation fee.

 

◆ Format of the Workshop

English and Japanese.

◆ Requirements for Participation

Although any qualified applicant will be welcome to register, graduate students will be particularly welcome and the only recipients of financial assistance in the form of travel fellowships.

◆ Application Procedure

For detailed information please see the following files.

Announcement (PDF)

Please download the application format.

Application Format (word)

◆ Application Deadline

Participations: June 8, 2018 (Japan time)

Applicants for travel fellowship: April 26, 2018 (Japan time)

◆ Inquiries

Questions about the content of the workshop should also be directed to the following address.

rcwbc.office@gmail.com

Research Center for World Buddhist Cultures at Ryukoku University

Sponsors
Research Center for World Buddhist Cultures, Ryukoku University
Centers for Japanese Studies and Buddhist Studies at the University of California, Berkeley
Shin Buddhist Comprehensive Research Institute, Otani University
Poster
Workshop on Tannishō Commentarial Materials at Ryukoku University (Fourth Meeting)

【June 8, 2018】 Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism Special Lecture

Date
Friday June 8, 2018, 3:00~5:00 pm
Place
Conference Room, 2nd Floor West Hall, Ōmiya Campus, Ryukoku University
Presenter
(Timetable)

The Toshihide Numata Book Award in Buddhism was established in 2009 in order to support the further development of the Buddhist studies especially in the Western world. The winning entry for the best academic Buddhist title of the year is selected by an independent committee. The awardee for fiscal year 2016 was Dr. Janet Gyatso, Hershey Professor of Buddhist Studies, Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs, Harvard Divinity School, and her Being Human in a Buddhist World: An Intellectual History of Medicine in Early Modern Tibet. Dr. Gyatso is the scholer of the early modern Tibetan Buddhism who also pays great attention to the issues of the Tibetan culture, society and jender.

On June 8, 2018, Dr. Gyatso held the special lecture whose title was “Categories, Mentalities, Individuals: Historiography in a Buddhological Vein.” In her lecture, Dr. Gyatso explained the relationship between Buddhist terms used in Tibetan medicine and the empiricism of the medical treatment, and also discussed their background.

 

 

“Categories, Mentalities, Individuals: Historiography in a Buddhological Vein”

 

Speaker: Dr. Janet Gyatso

(Hershey Professor of Buddhist Studies, Associate Dean for Faculty and Academic Affairs, Harvard Divinity School)

 

Chair, Interpreter: Eisho Nasu (Professor, Ryukoku University)

Respondent: Takahiko Kameyama (Adjunct lecturer, Ryukoku University)

 

  • Free of charge. No reservation is needed.
  • Both the lecture and response are held in English. They are simultaneously translated into Japanese.

Inquiries:rcwbc.office@gmail.com

 

Conference Room, 2nd Floor West Hall, Ōmiya Campus, Ryukoku University

Sponsors: Research Center for World Buddhist Cultures, Ryukoku University and Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai (Society for the Promotion of Buddhism)
Supporter: Research Center for Buddhist Cultures in Asia, Ryukoku University
Poster
[Third Meeting] Toshihide Numata Book Prize in Buddhism Special Lecture